Does having an attractive front yard matter

An update in the Japanese Sports car world.

Does having an attractive front yard matter

Japanese Sports Cars: A Dying Breed?

Is Japan still a nation of car fans that it used to be? This is an intriguing question to ask. Expensive vehicle taxes, stricter environmental regulations and an economy in recession have forced most Japanese to reconsider their motoring needs. That, together with a younger generation that prefers to use public transportation such as trains, subways and buses rather than drive a car, leaves many of us in doubt.
Mitsubishi
Mitsubishi has already started developing hybrid vehicles. The brand is already working towards shifting its efforts and company image into producing more environmentally-friendly vehicles. It’s only a matter of time before the Lancer Evolution, the high-performance sports car manufactured by Mitsubishi Motors, and also known as the “Evo,” is phased out.
Honda
Honda has entered the eco-performance field with the CR-Z. There are also rumors that the follow-up of the NSX will also be a hybrid, with several electric motors. Toyota continues to expand their Prius range of vehicles and ventured into hybrid motor racing with the TS030. The car participated in, but was unsuccessful at, the 2012 24 Hours of Le Mans endurance race, but it was successful in alerting the consumers regarding its initiatives in producing hybrid cars.
Subaru
Even Subaru has shifted their efforts from the sports car market into the luxury car market. After withdrawing their participation from, and canceling their World Rally Championship (WRC) program in Dec. 16, 2008, the Impreza has continued to become heavier and more subdued. It makes us wonder if it’s still necessary to have a Subaru Tecnica International (STi), the motorsports division of Subaru, and how long it will take before it is cancelled like the Evo of Mitsubishi Motors.
Nissan
Today, there are rumors that Nissan could be reconsidering the GT-R, the car that attracted interest in a brand that has been dormant for several years. The Fairlady Z was successful, but aside from that, the newer models haven’t lived up to the success of their ancestors. The GT-R showed where the future of Nissan’s performance motoring is headed, but a new GT-R has yet to be approved, and we can’t help but wonder if it, too, will be phased out.
Conclusion
However, there is still hope for Japanese Sports Cars. Subaru and Toyota have joined their efforts and manufactured the BRZ and 86, and this collaboration was a big success which renewed interest in compact sports coupes. Hopefully, the car’s success will inspire their competitors to manufacture similar sports cars.
Eco-friendly motoring is an unstoppable trend and we believe that it will continue in the future. The Japanese are at the front lines of this movement, but we hope that the manufacture of exciting and affordable Japanese sports cars are not sacrificed because of this trend.